Sweet N' Salty Toasted Coconut Chips

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Hi guys, guess what? I have a great 6-minute recipe for you today. 6 minutes! We all have 6 minutes in our day. Of course its delicious, but it is also super speedy, which means that you have more time to be productive during your day. Or watch 5 straight episodes of the Real Housewives. Does anyone do that? No? Asking for a friend.

It is no surprise that I travel a huge amount. I am probably on 4-5 planes a month, and typically take 3-5 big roadtrips a year. I have long been an advocate of preparing food in advance before traveling, even before I ventured down the paleo path. This isn't just because I'm perpetually concerned about food quality (Although I am, definitely), but also because the idea of paying $12 for a fast food meal makes me shudder.

Since I have taken so many roadtrips the past few months, I have started to realize how eating on the road and in airports is different; I have realized that food sourcing in airports is a whole different ballgame than food sourcing on the road. Airports are starting to become more attuned to the health-food movement, so finding things such as kombucha and kale chips isn't as hard as it was even 2 years ago.

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However, gas stations, roadside diners, and mom 'n pop restaurants typical of long road trips have limited options. This is even exemplified in more rural areas, and I've realized that "food deserts" is very much a problem. I have discovered many areas of the country where the only chains are fast food places, fresh produce in grocery stores is limited, organic foods are not an option, and the idea of grass-fed anything in laughable. Perhaps this is why high quality food delivery services are becoming more prevalent? Hmmm, different discussion for a different day, I suppose.

Paleo roadtripping isn't too hard, afterall, if you have the space, it is easy enough to fill a cooler with ice and pack some treats. I have even gone as far as picking up a dozen free-range, organic, cage-free eggs from my local coop and taken them with me...did you know that fresh eggs (typically not from the grocery store) do not have to be stored in the fridge? As long as they are unwashed, they do not need to be refrigerated, within reason of course. I mean, don’t go keeping them in 100-degree weather.

When I am traveling a long distance, I also stock up on store bought dry goods.  Although, because I like to make things myself (I do run a food blog after all), I have figured out a way to make coconut chips. As delicious as store-bought coconut chips are, there is nothing quite like hot and toasty coconut chips straight off of the pan. They can also be made at home for a fraction of the cost, store well for traveling, are great for school snacks, and even better for munching on the go.

And ummm...I like them burned? (Not a question, I really do.)

That isn't actually a question. That's a statement. But I am looking for approval here. I've met many people who like charred veggies, and extra-crispy bacon, but burned coconut chips?? Anyone? Come on, it can't just be me.

Some cook's notes:

  • These can burn very fast, so if you don't like the burned, watch them closely.
  • If you don't want a sweeter coconut chip, just omit the coconut sugar.
  • I used coconut flakes for these coconut chips, although if you have the dedication, you can make your own flakes by shredding your own coconut.

sweet n’ salty toasted coconut chips

Makes 3 cups

  • 3 cups coconut flakes
  • 3 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 tbsp. coconut sugar plus 2 tsp.
  • 3/4 tsp. himalyian pink sea salt
  1. Heat olive oil, salt and coconut sugar in a heavy-bottomed pan on medium heat.
  2. Add coconut flakes and constantly stir until brown and toasted.
  3. Remove from eat immediately, let cool, and enjoy.

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